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Tuesday, July 31, 2012

S&W and Dept of Public Works Frustration

WILL PICTURES HELP?   <<< Click Link to see more.
Roberts Parking lot taken from corner of Nelson and Dublin Robert's Parking Lot taken from Dublin Street

From: NorthWest Carrollton Board Member
To: RecoveryRoads@nola.gov
Cc: SHead@cityofno.com, MarkD.Jernigan@nol.gov, csgrant@nola.gov,
Subject: ATTN: Charon
Date: Jul 30, 2012 1:34 PM
Attachments: SEE LINK

Good Day Charon:
Subsequent to our conversation on Saturday at the Town Hall Meeting and a VM I left in the recent 1/2 hour, I am forwarding you the email chain regarding the catch basins we spoke about. As Ms. St. Martin indicates in her email, I have been working on this for the neighborhood for over three years. The problem has become insurmountable since the addition of the Roberts Market/Walgreens construction due to them being built up and the additional water flowing into Dublin and Nelson Streets. Please see listed catch basin below. In addition, I have also attached photographs of the areas effected by these non-functioning catch basins.
Please email me back, or call me directly to let you know that you are in receipt of my request and with follow-up information on whether these have ever been on the "schedule" or when they will.
I thank you for your time. It has been most difficult and exasperating to deal with DPW. I am hoping for better under the new management team.
 
LOCATION OF CLOGGED CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERT’S GROCERY ON CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN STREETS:
CORNER CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN , DUBLIN STREET, EAST SIDE
CORNER CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN, DUBLIN STREET, WEST SIDE
DUBLIN STREET ENTRANCE TO ROBERTS MARKET
2420-2422 DUBLIN STREET, (AT THIS TIME, THIS ONE DRAINS)
CORNER DUBLIN AND NELSON, DUBLIN STREET, WEST SIDE (AT THIS TIME, THIS ONE DRAINS)
CORNER DUBLIN AND NELSON, DUBLIN STREET, EAST SIDE
CORNER NELSON AND DUBLIN, NELSON STREET, SOUTH SIDE ADJACENT TO ROBERTS GROCERY
CORNER NELSON AND DUBLIN, 8100 BLOCK OF NELSON, NORTH SIDE
Kindest Regards,
Northwest Carrollton Civic Association

-----Original Message-----
From: NorthWest Carrollton Board Member
To: "<MSTMARTIN" <""<MSTMARTIN""@swbno.org>; csgrant <csgrant@nola.gov>; MarkD.Jernigan <MarkD.Jernigan@nola.gov>
Cc: susang.guidrysgguidry <susang.guidrysgguidry@nola.gov>; jclarkson <jclarkson@cityofno.com>; SHead SHead@cityofno.com;
Sent: Tue, Jul 24, 2012 8:12 am
Subject: Fwd: CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERTS MARKET ON CLAIBORNE

Mr. Jernigan:

The email exchange below was forwarded for me to you, by Ms. St. Martin, yet I still have not heard back from anyone at Public Works, nor have the issues been addressed. I would like to know when the catch basins will be cleaned. The rain this week caused substantial flooding and was primarily due to the 6 of the 8 basins listed below that have not drained since pre Katrina. I have spent countless hours documenting the flooding and sending emails to the Public Works office...yes, when Mr. Mendoza was there...unfortunately, I received the same response as the one I have gotten from you. Nothing.

Please either email me back or call me directly at (504) 975-8287 to discuss when we can expect some action and resolution from the Public Works Office.
Northwest Carrollton Civic Association

-----Original Message-----
From: STMARTIN, Marcia <MSTMARTIN@swbno.org>
To: NorthWest Carrollton Board Member
Sent: Mon, Jul 16, 2012 9:38 pm
Subject: FW: CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERTS MARKET ON CLAIBORNE

Per your request
Marcia
Marcia A. St. Martin
Executive Director
Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans
625 St. Joseph Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70165
504-585-2210
504-585-2448 ( Fax)


From: STMARTIN, Marcia
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 11:56 AM
To: csgrant@nola.gov; Mark D. Jernigan
Cc: BECKER, Joe
Subject: FW: CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERTS MARKET ON CLAIBORNE
Mark,
SWB has forwarded this request to DPW numerous times over the last few years. Please respond to the citizen.
Thanks
Marcia
Marcia A. St. Martin
Executive Director
Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans
625 St. Joseph Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70165
504-585-2210
504-585-2448 ( Fax)



From: NorthWest Carrollton Board Member
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 9:49 AM
To: STMARTIN, Marcia; susang.guidrysgguidry@nola.gov; jclarkson@cityofno.com; SHead@cityofno.com
Cc: miguelhonduras@aol.com; marc@robertfreshmarket.com
Subject: CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERTS MARKET ON CLAIBORNE
Ms. St Martin:

After yesterdays' rain, I am writing to ask that you have the following catch basins cleaned immediately. I have written to you and Mr. Medoza (I am aware he is no longer with the city offices) about these many times in the past and still have not gotten anything done. The area is flooding EVERY time it rains, no matter how fast or how hard the rain comes down. This is not due to the fact that the pumps can not handle the rain, as there are two drains that work...the ones listed below have NEVER drained and were NEVER cleaned after Katrina. I spend time cleaning the outside areas and have asked Roberts market in assisting me with the ones that surround their property. We will be working on this today.

In my previous emails sent to you in the past several years, I have also attached photos. If you feel these are still necessary to get this issue addressed, please do not hesitate to ask and I will provide them.

Please see the list below: If you have any questions you may reach me back via email at this address or call me directly at (504) 975-8287.
LOCATION OF CLOGGED CATCH BASINS SURROUNDING ROBERT’S GROCERY ON CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN STREETS:
CORNER CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN , DUBLIN STREET, EAST SIDE
CORNER CLAIBORNE AND DUBLIN, DUBLIN STREET, WEST SIDE
DUBLIN STREET ENTRANCE TO ROBERTS MARKET
2420-2422 DUBLIN STREET, (AT THIS TIME, THIS ONE DRAINS)
CORNER DUBLIN AND NELSON, DUBLIN STREET, WEST SIDE (AT THIS TIME, THIS ONE DRAINS)
CORNER DUBLIN AND NELSON, DUBLIN STREET, EAST SIDE
CORNER NELSON AND DUBLIN, NELSON STREET, SOUTH SIDE ADJACENT TO ROBERTS GROCERY
CORNER NELSON AND DUBLIN, 8100 BLOCK OF NELSON, NORTH SIDE


Thank you for your immediate attention in this matter.

Respectfully,

Northwest Carrollton Civic Association

Monday, July 30, 2012

SELA Projects Corps of Engineers and Sewerage & Water Board

TUESDAY JULY 31, 2012 @ 6 PM

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans
and the United States Army Corps of Engineers
invite you to attend
a neighborhood information meeting 
to discuss upcoming drainage improvements
on S. Claiborne Avenue from Leonidas Street to Lowerline Street.

St. Mary’s Dominican High School
7701 Walmsley Avenue
New Orleans, LA
Use Parking Entrance on Burdette Street
For more information, please call 504-585-2450
or visit on the web at www.swbno.org/work_drainageSELA.asp

Sunday, July 29, 2012

NOPD CrimeWalk August 1st

Wednesday August 1 @ 6PM

A WALK Against Crime and with NOPD, lead by the PIGEONTOWN STEPPERS

You know the PIGEONTOWN STEPPERS from their THEIR EASTER SUNDAY MARCH.

Thanks to Jill Stephens of Carrollton Rivervend Neighborhood Association (CRNA) for organizing this walk.

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Neighborhood Growing....and recovering

"Nearly every New Orleans neighborhood experienced gains."
Including West Carrollton/Leonidas (includes NorthWest Carrollton)
which grew by 200-300 residential addresses.
See map below from GNOCDC Website.
GNOCDCValassisNeighborhoodGrowth

http://www.gnocdc.org/NeighborhoodGrowthRates/index.html

"All of the “sliver by the river” neighborhoods added households between 2010 and 2012, marking a reversal of trends between 2008 and 2010 for Audubon, Black Pearl, East Carrollton, East Riverside, French Quarter, Garden District, Iberville, Irish Channel, Touro, Uptown, and West Riverside when these neighborhoods actually lost households. However, only five of the elevated east bank neighborhoods (Black Pearl, Central Business District, East Carrollton, Lower Garden District, and Marigny) have reached 100 percent of their June 2005 pre–Katrina number.

And here is the 2010 census data for the Leonidas/West Carrollton Census Tract

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Capital Improvement Plan 2013-2017

City Planning Commission Public Hearing Notice

Capital Improvement Plan 2013-2017

The City Planning Commission, in accordance with Sections 3-117, 5-402, and 6-104 of the Home Rule Charter of the City of New Orleans, will hold public hearings to consider Capital Budget requests by the departments and agencies of the City for the 2013-2017 program years. The hearings will be held in the City Planning Commission’s conference room, located at 1340 Poydras Street, Suite 900, on the following dates:

Monday, June 25 Departments/Agencies:

9:30-10:30am City Council

11:00-12:00pm Civil Service Department

1:00-2:00pm French Market Corp. & Upper Pontalba Bldg. Rest. Corp. 

2:30-4:00pm Department of Sanitation

Thursday, June 28

9:30-10:30am New Orleans Museum of Art

11:00-12:00pm Reserved for continuation or rescheduling

2:30-4:00pm Department of Parks and Parkways

Friday, June 29

9:30-10:30am Information Technology & Innovation (Chief Admin. Off.)

11:00-12:00pm New Orleans Aviation Board

2:00-4:00pm Reserved for continuation or rescheduling

Thursday, July 5

9:30-10:30am Audubon Commission

11:00-12:30pm Dept. of Safety and Permits/Hist. Dist. Landmarks Comm.

Friday, July 6

9:30-11:30am Department of Public Works

Monday, July 9

9:30-10:30am New Orleans Police Department

11:00-12:00pm Municipal Yacht Harbor Management Corporation

2:00-4:00pm Department of Property Management

Wednesday, July 11

12:30-2:00pm Equipment Maintenance Division (Chief Admin. Off.)

Thursday, July 12

9:30-10:30am City Park Improvement Association

11:00-12:00pm Emergency Medical Services (Department of Health)

2:00-4:00pm New Orleans Public Library

Friday, July 13

9:30-10:30am Homeland Security & Emerg. Prep. (Chief Admin. Office)

11:00-12:00pm New Orleans Fire Department

1:00-2:00pm Reserved for continuation or rescheduling

2:30-4:00pm New Orleans Recreation Development Commission


ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE ENCOURAGED TO ATTEND. PUBLIC QUESTIONS WILL BE ADDRESSED FOLLOWING THE STAFF DISCUSSION ON THE PROPOSALS.

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Monticello Canal July 20, 2012

See this Flickr Set of Photos taken by Tim Garrett on July 20th, 2012.
This is a before set of photos. Rain fell at a rate of 1 - 3 inches per hour for hours.
We were lucky and most of the rain fell in the French Quarter and Bywater, Mid City and Chalmette

We'll put up another set of photos after another sure to come rainstorm
in a few years when the SELA Projects which will funnel more water into both the Palmetto Canal and the Monticello Canal at faster rates are completed.


Thursday, July 19, 2012

New Orleans resurgent

See Article below from the Sacramento Bee.....Much more accurate coverage than the sensationalized New York Times.   And hands clapping for calling PostKatrina flooding a man made disaster.

New Orleans resurgent but troubled seven years after the storm

Published: Sunday, Jul. 15, 2012 - 9:00 pm
Carmen Mills had enough. Her husband was carjacked. Then there was a murder on her block in the Bywater neighborhood of New Orleans, long a rough part of a city that was falling to pieces.
This wasn’t long after Hurricane Katrina. The levees had failed and the city was in tatters. Mills and her husband decided to head out for New York City, like so many others leaving behind their beloved but wrecked City that Care Forgot.
Six months ago they moved back and found a city transformed. Neighborhoods that were bleak and crime-ridden even before the 2005 flood now have coffee shops, art galleries, bookstores and restaurants with local, seasonal ingredients.
After Katrina hit, people across the world watched for days on television as the mismanaged levees breached and a major American city descended into chaos and death. There were predictions New Orleans would never recover.
But many residents say New Orleans is a better place to live now than even before the devastating flood. There is a surge in entrepreneurship, with newcomers and native New Orleanians launching tech startups and other new businesses, saying there’s a spirit of creativity and possibility the hidebound city lacked before the storm. The traditional, clubby networks that ran the city were broken up by the disaster, said Tim Williamson, who runs a group that helps entrepreneurs attract investors. Everyone had to start over, he said, and that demanded ingenuity and risk taking.
“New Orleans became a startup city,” Williamson said.
The Brookings Institution reports entrepreneurial activity in New Orleans at 40 percent above the national average, with an average of 450 out of 100,000 adults starting businesses each year. That is nearly double the rate it was before the hurricane.
The city has become a magnet, in defiance of those who forecasted its downfall. New Orleans grew faster than any major U.S. city in the 15 months following the 2010 Census, the latest figures available.
Mills is back in the Bywater neighborhood she left in the face of crime and despair a few years ago. Now her worry is the potential of too much development in what’s become one of the city’s hottest neighborhoods, changing its funky and unique character of music, cafEs and artist studios, pushing gentrification too far over the edge.
“I don’t want my neighborhood to change,” she said.
New Orleans has become a little more accessible, less an outpost. But it remains a place like nowhere else, with its own culture of music and food, where streets have names like Desire, Royal and Elysian Fields, a city that celebrates misfits and living.
Some things about New Orleans haven’t changed. It’s still a place that manages to be sublime and heartbreaking at the same time.
Not all New Orleanians benefit from the city’s renaissance. It is a different city for the very poor. Much of the Lower 9th Ward, a low-income African-American neighborhood hit the hardest by the storm, remains blighted. In some parts, where there used to be a house every 60 feet or so, homes where families had built their lives for multiple generations, it is now overgrown with thick Louisiana vegetation that harbors garbage, snakes, possums, raccoons, rats and worse. The charred body of a murder victim was found last August inside a white Dodge Charger that was abandoned and torched.
“Everything is about race here, everything is about class here and everything is about not wanting certain parts of the city to come back,” said Vanessa Gueringer, who lives in the 9th Ward and is pushing for schools and a grocery store there.
New Orleans has the highest per-capita murder rate in the country, with killings concentrated in the city’s poorer neighborhoods. The city is still sick from the storm. An estimated one out of every four homes in New Orleans remains vacant.
There are about 40,000 such abandoned buildings throughout the city, many still bearing the search-and-rescue markings indicating whether dead bodies were found inside after the flooding. There are twice as many homeless people in New Orleans as before the storm. They often seek shelter at night in the derelict buildings, living among garbage, filth and rotting floorboards, relieving themselves in a bucket in the hallway while not far away people enjoy a city renewed, a place that draws movie stars and entrepreneurs with astonishing music, culture and cuisine.
“It is a tale of two cities,” said Martha Kegel, who leads an alliance of nonprofits that fight homelessness.

Lost in the water
There’s hope mixed with despair, often in the same block, in the Lower 9th Ward. Nice, well-kept homes sit between boarded-up derelict structures. This neighborhood became the national symbol of the flooding, a place where a massive red barge rode a torrent of floodwater into the neighborhood, landing atop houses and a yellow school bus. It’s a place that tour buses now come, bringing out-of-towners from the French Quarter for a “Hurricane Katrina Tour.”
“An eyewitness account of the events surrounding the most devastating natural – and man-made – disaster on American soil! . . . We’ll drive past an actual levee that ‘breached,’” declares Gray Line, which charges $48 for the excursion.
Robert Green doesn’t need to take the tour. He and his family tried to evacuate to Nashville, Tenn., the day before the hurricane hit but couldn’t make it out of the city because the traffic was snarled and they worried about his sick mother. They went to the Louisiana Superdome for shelter but the lines were long and, he said, his mother was turned away from receiving medical help, told that the staff wasn’t ready. They decided to try again the next day.
“We came back home. At four o’clock in the morning we were fighting 25 feet of water. We got to the attic and kicked our way to the roof as our house lifted off its foundation and started floating down the street,” Green said in a recent interview. “The house literally broke up underneath our feet. We lost my granddaughter, who was only 3 years old.”
Green and his brother were able to pull their 73-year-old, Parkinson’s-afflicted mother out of the water and revive her. But she was soon lost as well in the churning torrent. It took four months for Green and his brother to find her body.
Green now lives steps from his old home, in an ultra-energy efficient house built by actor Brad Pitt’s nonprofit foundation, which plans to build 150 brightly colored, modernist homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Green said that where he lives maybe 5 percent of the families have returned, but many others still ask about coming back, seven years after the storm.
“Every house that comes back brings back another family,” Green said. “Every family that comes back brings back more generations to the city.”

What if it succeeds?
New Orleans is growing, although it’s still smaller than before the hurricane. The U.S. Census Bureau puts the population at some 360,740 residents, or about 79 percent of what it was before. The city has seen a massive influx of federal recovery dollars go to public works jobs, almost $20 billion for rebuilding the city and strengthening the levee system. That helped it to weather the recession, as has the resurgence of the tourism industry. The city has become “Hollywood South,” with 46 tax-subsidized films or television shows shot in New Orleans last year alone.
Sal and Antonio LaMartina, fourth-generation New Orleanians, were at a Gulf Coast beach when Antonio got the idea of putting frozen margarita drinks into a squeezable pouch, kind of like a Capri Sun for adults. The product, “Big Easy Blends,” is now in thousands of Walgreens stores across the nation, among many other retailers. Sal is 32 years old and Antonio is 28. They have 135 employees and $27 million in projected revenue this year.
“There is so much young talent and new ideas here now,” Sal LaMartina said. “People are coming to New Orleans now, instead of everybody just leaving.”

A group called the Idea Village helped LaMartina to find investors. Idea Village founder Tim Williamson remembers the apathy in New Orleans during the late 1990s. He and a few other young businessmen would meet up after work in those years at Loa bar, a place named after benevolent voodoo deities, and talk about their crumbling city.
They dreamed up the Idea Village, a nonprofit to help sorely needed entrepreneurs start new businesses in the city. Williamson still sounds stunned as he recalls the reaction when he sought support from the local Chamber of Commerce.
“The guy said, ‘What if this thing fails? What if what you’re doing fails?’” Williamson remembered, shaking his head. “I thought, that is the problem with this city. Never should a business leader tell a young entrepreneur, ‘What if it fails?’”
The storm changed all that. Idea Village has since become a major player in New Orleans, helping raise $3.1 million in seed money for entrepreneurs. It’s worked with startups such as TurboSquid, which makes 3D software models for computer graphics, and Naked Pizza, which opened in a hurricane-damaged building in 2007 and now has 26 locations in the United States and Dubai, United Arab Emirates, with others planned from Nairobi, Kenya, to Anaheim, Calif. Those were founded by New Orleanians. Others, such as the educational software company Kickboard, were launched by newcomers who came to the city to help.
“The city attracted people who thought they could change the world,” Williamson said. “Those people flocked to New Orleans.”
Kickboard founder Jennifer Medbery is among them. The Columbia University graduate came to New Orleans as a founding teacher at a charter school after joining Teach for America. The software produced by the 28-year-old’s company is now used in nearly 100 schools across the country, helping educators track and share students’ academic performance.
“New Orleans represented opportunity in all shapes and sizes to reshape the education system here and prove what’s possible,” she said. “The sense of optimism and common purpose here is a big draw.”

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/15/4629639/new-orleans-resurgent-but-troubled.html#storylink=cpy

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

2626 Dublin - House for Sale

LOCATED IN THE CONVENIENT NorthWest CARROLLTON NEIGHBORHOOD.
A Quality Grocery ROBERTS AND 24 hour Pharmacy WALGREENS are just blocks away.
IF YOU LOVE TO WALK OR OWN A DOG Palmer Park is a great outdoor space just a few blocks away and across Claiborne Ave.
FOR THE JOGGER AND RUNNER YOU HAVE THE CHOICE OF A 440 PROFESSIONAL MAINTAINED TRACK At Harrell Stadium
OR THERE IS CARROLLTON AVE WHERE YOU CAN RUN WITH THE STEET CAR.

BEAUTIFUL WOOD FLOORS AND OPEN SPACE LIVING.

Take a look inside
http://www.movoto.com/la/2626-dublin-st-new-orleans/721_903187.htm

8415 Pritchard Place - House for Sale

TOTALLY RENOVATED Cottage in the Carrollton neighborhood only 3 blocks off of Carrollton Avenue. Home was professionally raised, leveled, & all foundation/shoring work performed.
NEW Electric, Plumbing, HVAC, interior & exterior finished.
Three Large INDEPENDENT bedrooms & 3 FULL BATHS!!!
Huge open den/living area & dining room.
Gourmet kitchen features GRANITE counters, ALL stainless steel appliances & custom cabinets.
Plenty of OFF STREET PARKING!

Take a look inside
http://www.real-buzz.com/RealEstate-detail/8415-PRITCHARD-PL_NEW-ORLEANS_Louisiana_70118_house-for-sale_USD_100630803

2517-19 Dante St - House for Sale

ENOVATED DOUBLE IN EXCELLENT CONDITION!  NICELY DONE WITH CENTRAL AIR/HEAT AND WOOD FLOORS. GREAT FOR AN OWNER/OCCUPANT…MOVE IN AND COLLECT THE RENT. WALKING DISTANCE TO THE GROCERY STORE, DRUG STORE, PALMER PARK AND THE STREETCAR….CONVENIENT UPTOWN LOCATION.

Take a look inside!
http://www.wirthmoorerealty.com/real-estate-commercial-residential/our-listings/uptown-double-money-maker

8437 South Claiborne Ave. - House for Sale

8437 South Claiborne, New Orleans Louisiana, 70118
Offered at $250,000
Raised basement on large 50x130 corner lot.
Upstairs offers wood floors, spacious rooms, lots of natural light, working fireplace, lovely sunroom, front and rear porches.
The downstairs space (which is being used as a separate apartment) has central A/H, concrete floors, a large den, a private sideyard and porch.
Additional 863 SF of basement storage, laundry and garage.
Lots of room to live and grow!

Take a look at the details and the photos!
http://www.wirthmoorerealty.com/real-estate-commercial-residential/our-listings/8437-s-claiborne-ave-at-joliet-st

2421-23 Joliet - House For Sale

Great Location. Great House.
Great photos.... See link!

http://www.wirthmoorerealty.com/real-estate-commercial-residential/our-listings/2421-23-joliet-st-northwest-carrollton-double

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Marilyn G. Barbera

BARBERA 
Marilyn G. Barbera

On Wednesday, July 11, 2012 with friends and family at her bedside, Marilyn quietly slipped away. Her strong Catholic faith in God has sustained her in her long battle with Cancer. Marilyn was preceded in death by her Mother, Mary Bertucci Barbera; her Father, Samuel Joseph Barbera; and her brother, Salvador Joseph Barbera. She is survived by her nieces: Marjorie Jean Barbera Duhon, Janet Barbera Kemp, and Sister-in-law, Marjorie Wolfe Barbera.

Marilyn received a Bachelor of Science from Loyola University and a Master's in Business. She retired from Charity Hospital where she was the Supervisor of their Pulmonary Lab. Family and Friends are invited to attend

The Memorial Mass of Christian Burial on Tuesday, July 17, 2012 at 12:00 noon. Visitation will begin at 10:00 AM at Mater Dolo-rosa Catholic Church, 1228 S. Carrollton Ave, NOLA 70118. Interment will follow at Lake Lawn Cemetery Mausoleum. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society 3636 S. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, La 70001 (504)837-0945.

http://obits.nola.com/obituaries/nola/obituary.aspx?pid=158528575

Marilyn was great support in NorthWest Carrollton's battle for the quality development of the corner of Claiborne and Carrollton.  When people beam about how "nice" this is now, Marilyn is one of the folks deserving thanks.

Saturday, July 14, 2012

2825 Cambronne

JP Morgan Aquisition Corp to Andrew Vanacore $137,000
2825 Cambronne

Friday, July 13, 2012

SELA Meeting with S&W Team - Claiborne Project

Carrollton Area Network
has invited Mrs. Marcia St. Martin and her S&WB of New Orleans Team
to present to the community their SELA and other capital projects to the Carrollton Community.


This Community Meeting is on Monday July 16, 2012 at 6:30PM
in the Sanctuary of Central St. Matthews United Church of Christ,
1333 South Carrollton (corner of Willow and South Carrollton).

The Community Meeting is an event for all residents in the Carrollton Area and residents of South Claiborne Avenue.  This is an informational and discussion event.

Sunday, July 1, 2012

AAA Fun in New Orleans

For the 3rd year in a row AAA members voted
New Orleans the  Best Large City for Weekend Getaway
Why?
Resturants, Music, Festivals, ....and Attractions
like WWII Museum which was voted Best Attraction

Best Large Hotel Hotel Monteleone
It has a great spa too - Spa Aria.

Best Bed & Breakfast Grand Victorian on St. Charles Avenue

Those of us who live here can have "weekend" getaway fun any day of the week!